Flashback Friday: “Snap! Crackle! Pop!”

I always thought Snap! Crackle! Pop! came into being around the time I started eating Rice Krispies.

Well, after a bit of research, it turns out these familiar elfin characters actually debuted in the early 1930’s.

After Kellogg’s introduced Rice Krispies cereal in the late ‘20’s, it didn’t take Krispie-crunchers long hear the distinct snap-crackle-pop noises the cereal made.  As soon as milk hit a bowl of Rice Krispies, the idea for Snap! Crackle! Pop! was born.

Before Snap! Crackle! Pop! turned into quirky spokeselves, it became the Rice Krispies catchphrase.  However, within just a few years, the three elfin brothers graced cereal boxes and print ads.

Over the years, Snap! Crackle! and Pop! have transitioned into more human-looking creatures, appealing to kids everywhere.  In fact, Snap! Crackle! Pop! is an international advertising phenomenon.

According to the good folks at Kellogg’s, Snap! Crackle! Pop! is known as Knisper! Knasper! Knusper! in Germany.

Go figure.  But to my ears, it just doesn’t have the same ring.

Snap! Crackle! Pop! have been spokeselves for more than 70 years.  Today, they’re still going strong.  In fact, they’ve diversified and now appear on Kellogg’s Rice Krispies Treats Squares and seasonal Rice Krispies cereals. You can even find them on TV, singing various jingles and mixing themselves up in all sorts of elfin hijinx.

So. There you go. Just a little bit of proof that classic advertisements aren’t always for expensive items or luxury manufacturers.  In fact, the most classic of all classic advertisements are for day-to-day purchases.  After all, advertisers have to work the hardest to make things like rice cereal more memorable and differentiate products from plenty of competition.

Credit: Leo Burnett Worldwide

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